Upcoming in the Theater
Free Country (Freies Land)
October 17th, 2021 Free Country (Freies Land)

Two cops investigate the disappearance of two teen sisters in a remote town, where it seems like everyone has something to hide – including the bodies…

In the Fall of 1992, police inspectors Patrick and Markus are sent off to a remote corner of the country to examine the disappearance of two teen sisters, 15 and 16. Did the two pretty girls just run away from their hick town, or did something more sinister happen to them? In this remote part of the country, the effects of the East German regime still muddy the waters. No one saw anything, the inspectors are greeted by iron silence. A photo negative showing the two girls naked and tied up in a hunting lodge seems to indicate a sex crime has been committed. The terrible suspicion is tragically confirmed when the girls’ dead bodies are found, raped and brutally murdered. While the relatives of other young women who have been missing for years come forward, the iron silence toward the cops turns into open hostility. Who has what to hide a

Rocky Horror Picture Show
October 29th - 31st, 2021 Rocky Horror Picture Show

In this cult classic, sweethearts Brad (Barry Bostwick) and Janet (Susan Sarandon), stuck with a flat tire during a storm, discover the eerie mansion of Dr. Frank-N-Furter (Tim Curry), a transvestite scientist. As their innocence is lost, Brad and Janet meet a houseful of wild characters, including a rocking biker (Meat Loaf) and a creepy butler (Richard O’Brien). Through elaborate dances and rock songs, Frank-N-Furter unveils his latest creation: a muscular man named “Rocky.”

Film Study for Adults - Native American Cinema
November 4th, 2021 Film Study for Adults - Native American Cinema

November is National Native American Heritage Month, and TPH's film studies classes for adults will be celebrating the cinema of Native filmmakers. Images of Native Americans have been prevalent in American cinema since the late 1800s, but more often than not, these images were produced without consultation or guidance from Native people. Distinct cultures of different tribes have been flattened into stereotypes, and non-Native actors have often been cast in roles as American Indians. First Nations activism starting in the 1970s has helped push forward dialogue about Native communities, and filmmakers from those communities have worked to take control over their media images. Contemporary First Nations filmmakers are working to redefine indigenous identities on screen, capturing the complexities of their experiences and presenting new ways of telling their own stories. TPH’s Native American Cinema course will explore the rich and resonant films being made indigenous filmmakers.